Eleanor Roosevelt- Her Quotes And Books

These are my favorite quotes from Eleanor Roosevelt.
– “You must do the things you think you cannot do.”
– “No one can make you inferior without your consent.”
– “You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. – You are able to say to yourself, ‘I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.”
– “You wouldn’t worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do.”
– “To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart.”
– “Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway. You’ll be damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.”

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962, was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952. President Harry S. Truman later called her the “First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rights achievements.

I found a few great books from Eleanor Roosevelt on Amazon.


You Learn by Living: Eleven Keys for a More Fulfilling Life

224 pages

One of the most beloved figures of the twentieth century, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt remains a role model for a life well lived. At the age of seventy-six, Roosevelt penned this simple guide to living a fuller life. You Learn by Living is a powerful volume of enduring commonsense ideas and heartfelt values. Offering her own philosophy on living, Eleanor takes readers on a path to compassion, confidence, maturity, civic stewardship, and more. Her keys to a fulfilling life?

  • Learning to Learn
  • Fear—the Great Enemy
  • The Uses of Time
  • The Difficult Art of Maturity
  • Readjustment is Endless
  • Learning to Be Useful
  • The Right to Be an Individual
  • How to Get the Best Out of People
  • Facing Responsibility
  • How Everyone Can Take Part in Politics
  • Learning to Be a Public Servant

Informed by her personal experiences as a daughter, wife, parent, and diplomat, this book is a window into Eleanor Roosevelt herself and a trove of timeless wisdom that resonates in any era.

The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt

280 pages

A candid and insightful look at an era and a life through the eyes of one of the most remarkable Americans of the twentieth century, First Lady and humanitarian Eleanor Roosevelt.

The daughter of one of New York’s most influential families, niece of Theodore Roosevelt, and wife of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt witnessed some of the most remarkable decades in modern history, as America transitioned from the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, and the Depression to World War II and the Cold War.

A champion of the downtrodden, Eleanor drew on her experience and used her role as First Lady to help those in need. Intimately involved in her husband’s political life, from the governorship of New York to the White House, Eleanor would eventually become a powerful force of her own, heading women’s organizations and youth movements, and battling for consumer rights, civil rights, and improved housing. In the years after FDR’s death, this inspiring, controversial, and outspoken leader would become a U.N. Delegate, chairman of the Commission on Human Rights, a newspaper columnist, Democratic party activist, world-traveler, and diplomat devoted to the ideas of liberty and human rights.

This single volume biography brings her into focus through her own words, illuminating the vanished world she grew up, her life with her political husband, and the post-war years when she worked to broaden cooperation and understanding at home and abroad.

The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt includes 16 pages of black-and-white photos and an afterword by Eleanor Roosevelt’s granddaughter


Tomorrow Is Now: It Is Today That We Must Create the World of the Future

176 pages

As relevant and influential now as it was when first published in 1963, Tomorrow Is Now is Eleanor Roosevelt’s manifesto and her final effort to move America toward the community she hoped it would become. In bold, blunt prose, one of the greatest First Ladies of American history traces her country’s struggle to embrace democracy and presents her declaration against fear, timidity, complacency, and national arrogance. An open, unrestrained look into her mind and heart as well as a clarion call to action, Tomorrow Is Now is the work Eleanor Roosevelt willed herself to stay alive to finish writing. For this edition, former U.S. President Bill Clinton contributes a new foreword and Roosevelt historian Allida Black provides an authoritative introduction focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt’s diplomatic career.